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Feb 14, 2012

Inquiry into wildlife crime


Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) launches inquiry into wildlife crime

The new inquiry will examine the scale of wildlife crime in the UK, including damage and destruction to species and habitats. It will also examine the scale of, and risks posed by, the illicit trade in wildlife and wildlife products. The inquiry will consider the role of the Government and other bodies in England and Wales in preventing, detecting and prosecuting these types of crime, as well as what action the Government can take internationally to tackle the problems of illegal trade.

The committee invites organisations and members of the public to submit written evidence, setting out their views on these issues. More wide ranging responses are also welcome. Submissions should ideally be sent to the Committee by Friday 24th February, although later submissions may be accepted.

See here for more information

 




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